Little Sis:

Working on cutting back on meat? Already cut back on meat and stuck in a rut? A nice summary of 5 protein-rich ingredients (including our favorite friend, lentils) to enhance your pantry.

Originally posted on URBAN ReTHINK:

meat alternatives

If there’s one thing environmentalists and your general practictioner will agree on, it’s that we should be eating less meat. High meat consumption has been linked to a variety of cancers, cardiovascular problems, and obesity, while its negative impact on the environment has raised alarm bells among scientists. An important source of greenhouse gases like carbon, methane and nitrous oxide, human-reared livestock now consumse an astounding 60% of all the food we grow, with 1 pound of beef taking up to 20 pounds of feed to produce. 

It’s time for some healthier, and greener, sources of protein in our diets. Here’s a look at 5 of them, each delicious and nutritious in their own way.

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9 responses

  1. I am so irritated by this slanted disinformation that I’m unsubscribing. Right. Now. This is not a health issue but a political one and you are helping Green Times in their efforts in this regard. Soy and soy byproducts should be researched more thoroughly by this blog. Shame. On. You.

    • Amy, I’m sorry that you are so angry. We are not, in fact, attempting to be political by sharing this piece. Here at the pantry we believe that there are many roads to good health and that sharing encouragement and information is a productive endeavor. If you’d like to share some information or concerns that you have about soy products, that would be a productive contribution that we would welcome.

      • I thought the article was well written. Tofu can be easily bought now that is organic and non-GMO certified. While we don’t eat a lot of soy, tofu once in awhile is quite tasty – and rounds out our meals! And I say yay to promoting lentils! The majority of lentils in the US are grown in my state :-)

      • http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/02/13/more-on-soy.aspx

        For starters.
        Also, google phtyoestrogen and its effect on the sexual development of our babies, esp. boys.

        Soy and its byproducts are in an alarming number of foods we consume. So unless we are cooking from scratch and staying away from processed foods, we get some every single day. It is in American diets whether we know it or not.

        As for the anti-meat comments: more disinformation. Grazing cattle help to break down the top layers of soil just by stepping on it. This aerates and allows for thicker foliage, which reduces runoff, etc. That’s one teeny beginner fact but I don’t want to write a chapters-long defense of cattle as it’s easy for anyone to research.

      • Thanks for sharing this information Amy. There are indeed many points of view that are easily researched on the internet. Hopefully we can all stay in the civil conversation long enough to be informed by all of them.

  2. Certainly what we eat, which is a source of not only physical but psychological nourishment and which provides so many opportunities for sharing, loving and nurturing is a hot topic. We – The Sis Sisters – truly do invite your comments knowing that it is difficult to deal with the topic of food without engendering some disagreement. It cannot be denied that what we choose to eat is in itself a political statement and information is incredibly important to a healthy political process. Please feel free to share your information and your choices with us as we share ours with you.

    • ” It cannot be denied that what we choose to eat is in itself a political statement and information is incredibly important to a healthy political process.”

      Seriously??? You choose your food as a political statement? Cross your heart? I’m completely befuddled by that. Please explain what that means.

      • All I’m saying is that, like it or not, what food you buy,from whom you buy it, and how it is raised has an impact on not only yourself, but on the larger community and on the planet. That kind of effect strikes me as somewhat political. I do try, although not always successfully, to let what I eat be positive not only for myself, but for my larger community.

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