Not Your Mother’s Warm Potato Salad (and Miso Dressing)

Spring is invigorating. Spring is beautiful. Spring holds so much hope and promise as fresh veggies begin to emerge… and yet…. so far in Mid Maryland Spring has been a bit of a weather disappointment. It’s been cold. More recently it’s been cold and wet. I’m not exactly complaining because, after this last winter, I continue to be grateful that it’s not snowing. But I have to admit that as soon as the landscape begins to green up, my taste buds begin to turn to raw fresh produce, and for the most part this is not much of a reality yet.

While I’d love a dinner comprised solely of raw, fresh veggies, the 45 degree rain dampens and chills that thought. And so I turn to comfort food. Comfort for my cold self, comfort for my sore foot, comfort for my impatient soul that is so ready to be outside playing in the sun. I realize I may be strange in this one, but for me, comfort often involves potatoes.

We sling a lot of spuds around here, in part because they make a nice foundation for a meatless meal that all four of us enjoy, and admittedly because Momma loves potatoes. In facing the 45 degree rain, some roasted potatoes sound like just the thing, but how to scratch that super veggie itch? I envisioned a plate – a salad in the sense that it has a lot of veggies combined, but warm and comforting. A potato salad, without mayonnaise or baked beans or any other picnic fare on the side, but with spring veggies in a warm comforting, nutritious medley.

For this potato salad, I don’t really have a “recipe” to offer as I simply combined foods, but I’ll tell you what I did. This is another situation where I would strongly recommend switching things out to meet YOUR preferences.

Not Your Mother’s Warm Potato Salad

My simple roasted potatoes are cut in chunks (probably around 1.5 inches), tossed in a little olive oil, salt, paprika and pepper to taste). Roasted in 450 oven on baking pan (single layer, spread out as much as possible) for about 25 minutes or until the outsides have browned and crisped and the insides are tender and heavenly.

IMG_0322To create our salad, I used the braised greens as a base, added a small pile of potatoes and added peas and mushrooms in my own personal pleasing ratio. Dressing is optional, but we found that this was delish with miso dressing. A creamier dressing or aioli would also pair beautifully with the potatoes.

 

Miso Dressing

  • 1 T yellow miso (would likely work with other kinds, but I can speak with authority on the yellow)
  • 1 T Bragg’s or soy sauce
  • 2 T rice vinegar
  • 1 T sesame oil

Combine ingredients and whisk until smooth. This dressing is light in flavor and works well with both warm salads like the one above and more traditional fresh green salads.

IMG_0327 IMG_0330  IMG_0328

Sun is peeking through this morning. Spring really is here, I know it, even if my feet are still cold. Perhaps it will be warm enough for a green salad for lunch.

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7 responses

  1. This looks like such an interesting salad! I love swiss chard and grow lots in my garden, however I have never thought of freezing it before. How do you prep it for the freezer?

    • In the past I have blanched it, last time I simply washed it, let it dry, and then stuffed it into a freezer bag and froze it. It worked. When I use frozen greens, they are always cooked and more often than not they end up in soup, so they don’t need to be pretty. Hope that helps.

  2. I love warm Potato Salad, this looks so good! Thanks so much for sharing your awesome post with Full Plate Thursday and hope you have a great week!
    Come Back Soon!
    Miz Helen

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