Happier Caramel-la Dipping Sauce (no added sugar, vegan)

Okay, so how do you make caramel sauce with no added sugar.  Caramel IS sugar – it’s just sugar cooked to a certain temperature with some butter thrown in, right?

Clearly there is only one way to make caramel that is ‘no added sugar’ and that is to leave out the caramel part.  Like low fat peanut butter.  How do you make low fat peanut butter….. leave out some of the peanut butter and put something else in there.   Doesn’t that thought make you want to read the label on the low fat peanut butter -yikes!

In this case however, the substitution is not scary – even if it is Halloween tomorrow.  In this case, you use the sweetness of dates, the smoky flavor of maca powder and almond butter to make a dipping or dripping sauce that will make any apple proud.

Who doesn’t like a caramel apple?  Okay, besides the mothers of small children – who doesn’t like a caramel apple?  It’s a great flavor combo and I confess a favorite treat that I can no longer abide because it is just too darn sweet.  So a recipe for caramel sweetened with dates caught my eye and from there I came up with something we will be dipping into with apples, carrots, bread, fingers and dumping on pancakes and french toast until it’s gone and they come begging and pleading for me to make more.  Oh how I love when they beg and plead for me to make more of a healthier alternative ;-)

The original caramel idea came from Emily at This Rawsome Vegan Life as part of a cookie recipe that sounds fabulous  I changed it up just a little, subbing almond milk for water and plain old sea salt for fancier salt

Happier Caramel-la Dip: (Substitute this for Nutella if you or your children are into Nutella)
1 cup dates
2 tablespoons maca powder
pinch of salt, to taste
3/4 cup water, more or less as needed (or almond milk – I ended up adding an additional Tbsp or so)
an equal amount of almond butter to the amount created by the first 4 ingredients
(If you don’t have maca powder, you could try using less liquid, or add a little oat flour as a thickener)

Make sure you use soft, moist dates.  Do not throw hard or dry dates in your blender.  If your dates are a little dry, soak them in a little water or almond milk first (for a couple of hours or more) and then use the soaking liquid and the dates and more liquid as needed to attain thick but creamy consistency.

20141030_112551This date thing is indeed not  about size, but about plumpness and softness.  A nice moist, plump, squishy date is what you want here.  Apply that philosophy where you will and choose the date on the left!

Mix all that stuff up in the blender (a tough blender is recommended).  It’s a bit of a mess but keep at it until you get a nice consistency.  You may have to add a bit more liquid to keep things rolling, just do so a little at a time and scrape  the sides of the blender as needed.

My original intention was for this to be the finished product – start dipping, right?

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Well my husband and I found the mixture a little too sweet and a bit on the smoky side for kids to enjoy.  I added about 1/8th tsp of ginger.  A little better but still not blown away.

Then I took 1/2 cup of this mixture
Blended in 1/2 cup of almond butter

Eh voila

The dipping went from pretty and gentle:

20141030_114221-001 to hand me that last apple slice and move over:

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Actually the addition of the almond butter also made it a lot healthier – much less sugar per bite, plus some protein – Dracula would approve and ask for more – “I vould like some more, please.” :-)

For other sweet dipping sauces, or pancake toppers:

maple cashew butter

Other alternatives to maple syrup at the breakfast table

Have a happy and safe Halloween!

Suh-weeeeeeet!!

teaspoon sugarHoney, (dum de dum dum dum-dum),
Awww sugar, sugar dum de dum dum dum-dum)
You are my candy Girl,
And you got me wanting you….

and wanting you, and wanting you, and wanting you.

Candy is dandy but it would appear that it is not just sugar that gets our little addiction centers flaring and sends us diving into the far reaches of the pantry searching for something, anything that might be left over from the last candy-bash-of-an-excuse-for-a-holiday-celebration.

Sugar (in all of it’s manifestations) is a purveyor of the addiction, but it is the sweetness of sugar that makes us want more.  Unfortunately, this means that sugar substitutes, the supposed friends of dieters, also increase our desire for more sweets.  As the writer of a review of the latest condemnation of non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) puts it, “There is every reason, residing in sense as well as science, to suspect that NAS contribute just as readily to this phenomenon as caloric sugars. The commonly used artificial sweeteners are intensely sweet, all much more so than sugar. The net result, then, is that while NAS might remove sugars and the associated calories at any given time, they would cultivate the sweet tooth that would favor their readmission at some other time. That’s easily done, since there are popular brands of bread, crackers, chips, pretzels, salad dressings and pasta sauces with added sugar. One might favor such products due to a sweet tooth, and never even be aware of it,” (David Katz, M.D.)

In other words, artificially sweetened foods and beverages still up the ante in what you consider to be sweet and encourage your preference for sweet foods.  Thus the buns and fries at McDonald’s which have sugar added, might be preferable to a whole grain bun or oven baked fries simply because they are sweeter.

Unfortunately, I am personally very aware of the sweet side of cravings.  Despite the fact that I have greatly decreased the amount of processed sugar in my diet and can no longer tolerate many commercial products because they are too sweet, the amount of raisins in my day seems to be escalating… and I have been choosing a rather sweet poppy seed dressing over my usual balsamic vinaigrette on my salad that just isn’t quite right without some fruit on top (raisins if nothing else seems to fit).  These are not necessarily bad choices but I know when I’m peering over the precipice of the slippery slope people because I have been at the bottom of that slope.  I was a jawbreaker cracking, gum chewing child who spent most of her allowance on candy and boxes of Lucky Charms or  Count Chocula cereal.  Yikes – I’m dating myself again as Count Chocula was apparently the very first chocolate flavored cereal with chocolate marshmallows.  Such a distinction! ;-)

All this to say that decreasing sugar is difficult because it is very prevalent and we love our sweet.  Unfortunately how much sugar you consume is also an important health choice, for you and for those you feed.  The publication of the above article which reveals that NAS also destroy the good bacteria balance in your gut prompted me to review some of our pantry Sugar Busting strategies and I thought you might enjoy, or benefit from some of our early posts on Sugar Busting as well.  Someday advertising for highly sweetened products (be it with sugar or NAS) will be banned from television as were ads for liquor and cigarettes to protect the public health.  But in the meantime, here are some of our past blogs about the evils of sugar.  The Sugar Busting Series also has a lot of recipes for reduced sugar treats and breakfast alternatives (since breakfast is a very sugary affair for most people), but for the most part the following are information about sugar, where sugar is lurking, and ways to reduce sugar in your diet.  Sorry to be the bearer of bad news…. but it keeps me off the streets seeking my next score of sugar ;-).

Here are the links and I wish you a healthy and savory weekend!

Sweet Duplicity – The many names of sugar and how manufacturers hide them from you!

Giving Hidden Sugar the Boot – Part 1

Giving Hidden Sugar the Boot – Part 2

Abstinence Makes the Taste Grow Stronger – the trap of ever increasing amounts of sugar

Reducing Sugar 1 Teaspoon at a Time

Lessons from the Cereal Aisle – reducing the cost and sugar in your breakfast

Info on the documentary Fed Up which addresses the power of sugar in our food supply

Special fruit recipes to rein the sweet tooth in a little

How Sugar Strict Should You Be?

Wait! Don’t Eat the Halloween Candy! – alternative celebratory ideas and what do you do about all that candy?

Replace Those Unhealthy Health Foods Part 1

Replace Those Unhealthy Health Foods Part 2

Chocolate Steel Cut Oats in the Crockpot (oh my but these are good and not very sweet!)

Here Comes Peter Cottontail – a meaningful holiday coated with sugar

The Real Bears – the real soda drinking bears…. a song and short video.  Check it out!

Homemade Sports Drink – most sports drinks have a ton of sugar or NAS – try an alternative

The Sweet Stuff – how much has amount of sugar we consume changed? Engaging graphics show you.

Sweet Stuff on Top – alternative toppers for pancakes, french toast, waffles…

Eat Food. Real Food.  – Sugar as we now eat it is not natural food.

Sugar Busting – Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s interview on 60 Minutes about the toxicity of sugar

Travelling Beverages – Make your own!

 

Pumpkin Apple Steel Cut Oats in the Crockpot

That’s a horribly long name.  Pasco would be better, but then again you wouldn’t have any idea what that would taste like would you?  This, on the other hand lets you know that you are soon to be treated with some of the lovely flavors of Fall. And if you pour it all into an oiled crockpot right before you go to bed and turn it on you will awaken to a heavenly, hearty – come on it’s a wonderful day to be alive – kind of smell..followed by a hearty, healthy breakfast.

This was a variation on the Chocolate Steel Cut Oats Little Sis introduced us to in one of her many brilliant moments.  I LOVE those chocolate oats, but my husband had trouble adjusting to the idea of chocolate breakfast.  He has since grown accustomed to the idea and loves the chocolate oats as well, but the idea for a variation was already cooking (slowly in a crock with a glass lid) in my brain, so I thought I’d better try the idea.  Space is after all limited in said brain these days.

While I have never had a Pumpkin Latte from Starbucks, they are apparently a big deal.  After seeing lattes advertised everywhere lately and having some pumpkin in the house, it seemed like a good idea to put some pumpkin in our breakfast  We were all pleased with the results and I bet your Autumn People will like it as well.

Pumpkin Apple Steel Cut Oats

2 c steel cut oats
1 c pumpkin (I used canned)
7 cups water and or milk (I used 1/2 water and 1/2 almond milk)
2 tbsp cinnamon
2 chopped apples (I left skins on)
1 Tbsp vanilla
1/2 Tbsp salt
1 tsp allspice

I recommend you oil the crockpot.  I use coconut oil.  If you don’t have that, use something mild that won’t be an odd flavor.

Put the oats in.

Mix the pumpkin in with some or all of the liquid you are using so you can get some of the lumps out.

Pour the mixture and all of the other ingredients into the crockpot – give a bit of a stir.  Put the lid on and set it on low.  My crockpot has kind of a high ‘low’ and these cereals tend to be done in about 5 hours.  If yours has a timer you could set it for 6 if you will be asleep longer than that.  I don’t have a timer and the top of the edges of these cereals can get a little crispy when left to long, but no burning and no problem.

I did not add sugar to his recipe.  I added raisins directly to my bowl and was satisfied with the sweetness.  If your crowd requires more sugar you can always add it after the fact or throw a couple of Tbsp of maple syrup into the crockpot.   All 3 of us enjoyed this a lot and it always pleases me to have a breakfast that has a bit of vegetable in it!

20140928_075629Very good indeed and just the ticket to eat when we were up early to go for a canoe trip on the Harpeth River.  A Great Blue Heron spread it’s great wings and led us down river on 3 separate occasions and almost let us catch up for a really close view on the last time….. then spread his wings and flew off again.  Here and gone, like the seasons.  I do so love this season and intend to savor it – full belly and overloaded brain and all.  :-)

 

Broccoli ‘Cheese’ Soup – all of the taste with much less fat

One of the most wonderful things about a powerful blender is the creamy soup that can be created and poured… or schmoved with a spatula into bowls – already hot!  If your blender isn’t strong enough to heat, then you can always pour this into a pot and heat after you’ve creamed it.  There is nothing like soup to fill the belly and warm the soul.

We experimented with a lot of soups when we first bought a Vita Mix (15 years old and still going strong).  One of our favorites was Broccoli Cheese Soup.  What’s not to like about Broccoli Cheese Soup?  Well, once you determine that you can’t handle dairy, and there are those that argue that the fat in dairy is a bad choice, and those that would rather leave the cow’s milk to the cow’s…. well then, the cheese is not to like about broccoli cheese soup.  So here is my dairy free version, loosely based on the recipe for broccoli cheese soup found in the Vita Mix recipe book.

Dairy Free Cheesy Broccoli Soup

1 tsp oil
3 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
1 onion, roughly chopped
4 cups steamed or blanched broccoli
1 cup raw cashews soaked in water for about 5 hours or more (I put the cashews in a 2 cup measuring cup and then fill to the 2 cup line with water
1 c unsweetened milk – I used almond
1 c water
1.5 Tbsp bouillon

You can also substitute broth for water – or broth for water and milk.  Whatever works for you!

Steam or blanch your broccoli – keeping in mind that stemmy pieces need a little more cooking than plain florets.

I prefer to saute my onion and garlic before adding it to soup.  Just saute until translucent while steaming your broccoli (which I did in the microwave)

Put all ingredients in the blender and whirrrrr it up, or more accurately,  sideways until it is smooth and blended and if you don’t want to heat in a pot – let it spin till it’s hot!

I served mine with some broken up toasted Ezekiel bread.  My husband said it was fabulous but I was too busy eating to notice ;-)

This took 20 minutes from the beginning of chopping onion to pouring in the bowls.  You gotta love that!

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Enjoy the arrival of Fall – may your windows be open, your skies blue and your hearts full like a pumpkin.

Bee Bim Bop – Korean Stir Fry

This dinner has a lovely beginning.  Before the sauteing, before the boiling, before the chopping…. before the garden and the grocery store.  Before all that came the children’s book.  My son and I stumbled on this lovely book in our neighborhood library when he was 5.

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The book tells the tale of a little girl shopping with her mother to purchase the ingredients for a Korean dish called Bee Bim Bop.  It rhymes and bounces along happily and on the very last page there awaits a recipe.  My then 5 year old son wanted to try it.  So we did and it has been a staple at our house in the 9 years since we read the book :-)

The recipe can be made with or without meat, although I do believe that the egg is a wonderful addition.  I make it with veggies and egg now, but I used to use chicken.

Whichever way you try it, it’s delicious and if you have small children, this book is a great place to start to introduce them to something new.  In fact, it would make a lovely time to read it and then cook it together.  Nothing says try me like something you’ve cooked yourself!

This is my take on the recipe from the book – meatless and, in true Pantry style – with the veggies I had on hand.

Ingredients:
2 cups brown rice
2 cloves of garlic
4 scallions, sliced, including most of the green
5 Tbsp soy sauce (I use Bragg’s liquid aminos)
2 Tbsp sugar
1 Tbsp vegetable oil (I used avocado)
1 Tbsp roasted sesame oil
1 teaspoon roasted (or raw) sesame seeds (optional)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
4 carrots
a head of broccoli cut into florets
2 cups fresh spinach
4 eggs
salt and pepper
Tabasco sauce

If you want to use meat, then cut down the amount of vegetables and mix the garlic, soy sauce, scallions, sugar and sesame oil and marinate while cutting veggies / doing other prep.

Set rice to cooking at the beginning so it will be done in time.

Scramble the eggs and set aside – get out small fry pan to cook a thin layer of egg 4 times.  Oil the bottom as necessary for your pan.

For meatless version:

Mix soy sauce, sugar, sesame seeds, sesame oil and pepper.

Place vegetable oil in a frying pan and saute the minced or pressed garlic and the scallions.

Cook until translucent and fragrant.  Add the chopped veggies.

While veggies cook (not too long – keep ‘em green and bright!) Pour 1/4 egg into pan at a time and cook about 1 minute each side.

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When all 4 ‘omelettes’ are done, stack them and slice into ribbons.  I usually cut into ribbons and ten cut the ribbons in half.

Turn off the heat on your veggies and add the spinach. Stir it in to wilt.

Serve over rice with egg strips on top – and a bit of tabasco makes a wonderful addition to this.  If you want to be authentic you serve Kim Chee with it – a Korean spicy fermented cabbage that can be purchased ready made in many places.

Mix it all up – that’s what bee-bim means, ‘Mix mix’.

The original recipe encourages you to cook each item separately and then allow people to choose what they want.  That’s a lovely way to do it but on most nights I’m thinking, “Ain’t nobody got time for that!”  But if you do it’s yet another way to engage hesitant eaters…. at least they have a little say on what goes in the bowl!

Nice alternative veggies would be cabbage, mung bean sprouts would be good on top, or other hearty greens.

However you do it – this is a wonderful alternative taste to stir-fry.

To serve, put bowls of all the different meal components on the table and allow each family member to serve themselves. Pile the meat and veggies on top of the rice and top with the egg. Add some of the “gravy” from the cooked meat. Finally, mix (remember, “bee-bim” means “mix”) everything together. And enjoy!

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Why Should I Eat Something I Don’t Like?

Indeed.  Why should my son who asked that question of me?  Why should I?  It got me thinking about ‘First World Problems’ and starving children, but, let’s be honest.  Generations of parents have tried to convince their children that they should eat something nasty just because there are people in the world who would be happy to have that nasty thing which is WAY better than nothing.  But it doesn’t work.  It doesn’t work for children OR adults.  Empathy is not the forte of the young, especially when it really doesn’t make sense.  It is sad that others do not have enough to eat, or what they want to eat, but my son will say that if there is something he prefers right there in the cabinet, then why can’t he have that right now?  He knows what he eats for dinner won’t affect that poor child’s hunger either way.  So how to answer that question for him, and for myself.  In a culture that emphasizes choice, reward and satisfaction, why shouldn’t we always have something we like to eat?

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I chose a picture of broccoli because my son used to hate broccoli. The only way we could get him to eat it was to allow him to put ketchup on it (Bleah!) He still does not love it, but he eats it, without complaint, and without ketchup ;-)

I’ve got 3 responses to share with my son and myself:

A) You can acquire a taste for things / change your taste for things;

B) You have 1 body which you would like to be able to navigate through as much of this world / life as possible; and my personal favorite….

C) Because I made it and we’re all sitting down here together to eat it, dammit!  i.e. this is about more than your personal satisfaction.

I know, that’s all a bit flippant, so allow me to expand…

A) Indeed you can acquire a taste for things and even lose a taste for things!  I recently splurged on a purchase of some fancy Italian ice cream which was labelled chocolate / peanut butter.  Who knew the fancy Italian ice cream would have little peanut butter cup candies in it?  My mother will think I’m lying, but I removed the candy peanut butter cups because they were too sweet.  They made the ice cream cloyingly sweet to me, so I didn’t eat them.  Mind you, I used to ADORE Reese’s peanut butter cups.  They were my candy of choice and Younger Big-Bro could always get a good trade out of me at Halloween if he had Reese’s cups to offer.  However, I have lost my taste for milk chocolate and heavy duty sweets because I stopped eating them and learned to love other things that are not so sweet instead.  It can happen.  It took awhile!  Baby Steps friends, remember to take Baby Steps – small changes a bit at a time, like reducing amount or cutting it with something.  With chocolate you can slowly switch over to darker chocolate.  For more info on making switches – either fast or slow, see Baby Step #1 The Ol’ Switcheroo, or Baby Steps Boost which makes suggestions for how to take Baby Steps away from some common unhealthy foods.

It can also happen that people’s taste buds change as as they mature and as they age.  Little Sis will tell you that Miss Picky Pants (my adorable niece) has taste buds that can change overnight ;-)  If they haven’t tried it in awhile, have them try it again.  And not the touch the corner of the fork with your tongue and then make a face try.  An actual try that involves a bite, followed by chewing and swallowing.  We require 2 bites because the first one is still colored by negative expectations, or a poor guess.  This rule goes for adults also.  As a precursor to answer ‘C’ I say, “Put your Big Girl Panties on and just eat it – it won’t hurt you even if you don’t like it.”

B) If children were left to eat without any input, some of them just might develop some serious nutritional deficiencies.  Heck, many adults have serious nutritional deficiencies.  Personally I am low in iron.  I try to eat greens and cook in a cast iron pan to amend that situation.  I’m sure you know the basics of balancing protein, carbohydrates and including lots of veggies and fruits.  Perhaps more information about what nutrients are in our food and what those nutrients do for us would help allay the tendency to eat pizza every night.  Check out some resources for nutrient information:
– Charts on the nutrients in fruits, vegetables and fish
– 
An extensive list of foods and the nutrients they contain – this is a pdf booklet – you have to go through about 10 pages of other info before you get to the chart, but it is a good resource.

As we mentioned in the Baby Step on getting your kids engaged with change, try to tie in their personal goals with their food intake.  In other words, if they want to be an athlete stress the nutrients needed to help them get stronger and to grow healthfully.  If they want to do well in school stress the foods that will feed their brains….

Understanding the physiological need for a variety of healthy foods and the physiological benefits of a variety of healthy foods can be helpful in convincing yourself and others to eat things that are not your first, or even second or third choice.

C) Eating is about more than personal satisfaction.  It is part of the ritual of converting the bounty of the planet into bountiful community.  It takes a village to feed one gaping maw.  Recognizing the involvement of community, family or personal involvement on the resulting meal or even packed lunch takes a little emphasis off the pleasure and places it back on the living, necessity of eating.  So when our culture shines through in my son’s belief that he is entitled to have something delicious every time he eats, I can try to re-focus him on all of the reasons and all of the work that goes into feeding people.  Little Sis’ family starts the evening meal with some thanks to the one who prepared the meal.  What a great way to re-focus the meal on the bounty of being fed…. the bounty of having good nutrition…. and the bounty of being together and taking care of each other.

Should we live to eat? or eat to live?

Here at the Pantry we usually fall in the middle on such spectrums of possibility.  It surely seems too stringent to do either exclusively.  But there is definitely room in most of our lives for a little more eating to live.  Such a blessing to even have a choice!

Raw Milk, Kraft Singles, and Parmesan Cheese Recalls

FSNBIf you don’t eat dairy, please share these with your friends who do.

Cryptosporidium (a parasite that will make you feel totally blechy) in raw milk in Idaho; details here.

Kraft Singles recalled for temperature problems? I have no idea what that means, but if you’re buying singles, I would greatly encourage you to try a cheese that is a little less processed – the flavor is so much richer, and you can cut it into slices, I swear you can. You’ll save a bundle. Details on the Kraft situation here.

Parmesan cheese recalled for salmonella. Details here.

Eat well, be well friends.

Blueberry Pie w/ sweet potato & walnut crust- GF/DF

I do love sneaking the vegetables into places where no vegetable has gone before.  Vegetablization is like charting new territory and is great for your health ;-)  What better place to vegetablize than in places where I used to use gluten and can no longer due to Mr. Bigg Sis’ dietary constraints?  But don’t let no need to lose gluten slow you down here, because more vegetablizing is always a good, and in this case, a delicious thing.

You may recall that in the past I presented you with a walnut crusted apple pie.  It’s delicious but turns out more like a cobbler when all is said and done.  So I am still interested engaging the search for a healthy GF crust…. and will go back to the cobbler-y things if it doesn’t work, right?  Or try Little Sis’ nectarine cream pie with a walnut crust which is also GF / DF.  Oh the possibilities are endless…. and this possibility I combined the idea for a sweet potato crust (also tasty and cobbler-ish) with the walnut idea to see if that might yield something a bit more pie-like.

Blueberry Pie with Sweet Potato/Walnut crust

crust
2 cups shredded sweet potato
1 cup walnuts
2 tsp coconut oil
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp maple syrup
1 pinch salt

3 c blueberries (mine were frozen at home)
1/4 c sugar
1/4 + 1/8 oats (that’s 1/4 cup and then about a half again of a 1/4 cup measure)

Preheat oven to 375 and grease a pie plate (I used coconut oil)
Shred the sweet potato in the food processor

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Take it out and put all the other crust ingredients in the food processor and reduce to a fine crumble

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Add the sweet potato back in and process into a mash

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Spread the mash into the bottom of a greased pie plate (I found fingers more effective than a spoon)
Bake at 375 for 15 – 20 minutes or until it starts to get a little crisp.  If your crust is a little thin it will crisp better, but the thick crust was nice as well – just spread out well and evenly and up the sides

While the crust is baking, mix the blueberries, sugar and oats
Pour into crust when it has baked

Bake at 375 for about 30 minutes.  You can cover the top with foil if you like to protect the edges of the crust.

Feed it to happy, intrepid, inter-vegetable travellers…

20140831_184827-001 Now I will say that this came out a bit cobbler-ish as well, but the edges of the pie crust were crispy, so I”m thinking that if I made it a little thinner and cooked it a little longer prior to filling that it might come out more crispy.  On the other hand, this really rocked, and all 3 of us had seconds… so why mess with it?

20140831_184835-001May your September be full of pie!

 

 

GF Pancake Mix – Making Time for Pancakes

What if some fine morning when you have time to make pancakes you used 3 or 4 bowls?  1 bowl for the pancakes to make that day and the other 2 or 3 bowls to add all of the dry ingredients for another morning’s pancakes?  Might make it easier to get those cakes going on a busier morning…..

I’m still thinking about saving time, so when I saw this post from our good friend Annie at Unrefined Vegan, I decided I had to give it a GF go.  Please feel check out her version which is chock full of interesting grains and flours as well as the idea that you can flavor up a batch of pancakes or waffles once you start with the basic recipe.   Gluten free or Gluten full – pancakes are a lovely way to start the day and we’re going to see if I can whip up a batch of pancakes tomorrow morning before school if I have the head start of pre-mixing all of the dry ingredients. Continue reading

Summer Bounty Recipe Box

We have been having a VERY strange summer here. It’s been lovely. Like really nice, pleasant, only hot every now and again, rain every few days. Sounds great, right? Definitely NOT the Mid-Atlantic summer I’m used to. Predictably my Mid-Atlantic garden is having a mixed reaction. Some plants are LOVING it (i.e. zucchini and cucumbers), others are okay, but sort of underwhelming in production (tomatoes) and still others fell to the Japanese beetles that seem to enjoy this weather very much (beans). Our garden haul is predictably unpredicted. I’ve heard lots of folks reflecting on the same problem, with the bounty varying according to their region Thought I’d do a little roundup for YOUR garden bounty.

Cukes and Zukes
 
  

1. Indian Summer Cold Sesame Noodles

2. Easy Refrigerator Dills

3. Sweet and Sour Cucumbers
   Continue reading