Weekly Meal Plan 5/4-5/10

Wow. I kicked some major garden booty this past weekend and I am feeling pretty smug. Or at least I was feeling pretty smug until I looked at the weather forecast and realized that it’s supposed to be in the high 80s most of this week. Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m A-OK with some summery days arriving, but my little newly transplanted seedlings will not like it very much. What can I do about that? Give them a little shade is what I can do. I happen to have some of the kind of cover a lot of folks use for hoops to protect from frost or bugs. Here in mid-Maryland where late winter frequently hangs out until summer can make an appearance, I have found this kind of cover to be very useful – for cold nights and sweltering “Spring” days. So starting at about 2 pm I will cover those little babies and then get on with birthday preparations… for Mr. Little Sis.

Birthday planning is one of those areas where having different family cultures can really throw a wrench in things. In my extended family birthdays are pretty low key. Like, we are happy you were born, but let’s not get carried away, okay? In Mr. Little Sis’ family it’s like the freaking circus is coming to town JUST FOR YOUR BIRTHDAY. It took me a while to realize that this basic family culture difference was at the heart of what I rightly discerned as his very polite and yet still perceptible letdown on every birthday that I have orchestrated. I’ve upped the ante for the last couple of years with positive results, but am finding myself at a bit of a loss this year in the food department of the birthday celebration. I’ll sort it out, and it will be good, but you’ll notice an incomplete spot on my meal plan… and that is SUPER irritating to my inner OCD freak. Please forgive the omission and my neurotic response to it. I hope you are having a great week, that all your endeavors are established before the heat rises on them, and that you have plenty of cool foods to eat if you will be sweating… like the ones we have here…

Monday: Umbrian Lentil Salad, Green Salad, Whole Wheat Bread, Navy Bean Herb Hummus

Tuesday: Nutshroom Burgers, Sweet and Sour Pickles, green salad

Wednesday: Mr. Little Sis’ Birthday…. aaagh I don’t have a plan and I’m FREAKING OUT. Okay, not quite freaking out, but it’s not good people. I may just let him choose whatever he wants, which could mean just about anything depending on his mood.

Thursday: Singapore NoodlesMung Bean Sprouts Namul

Friday: Homemade Pizza, cut veggies

Saturday: Taco Salads (Picadillo as the chili, big greens and cut vegetables, some healthier tortilla chips)

Sunday: Homemade Pasta, green salad

Adult Lunches: Power Tabbouleh, Kale Avocado Sprouts Salad

Lunchbox Treats: Almond Lemon Jots


Looks like a great week. Nice cool summery foods to welcome what looks to be a very warm May. I hope you have a stellar week and that all the important people let you know how much they love you. Okay, maybe if just one does that it would be good. right? Eat well, be well friends.

Weekly Meal Plan 3/30-4/5

Shakin’ the tree… Shakin’ the food rut. Shakin’ it up. Doesn’t take me long at all to slip into a pattern with this meal planning business. I get bored. They get bored. Everybody gets crabby. Okay, so there may be more to the crabbiness than the dinner menu rut. The twins have discovered Harry Potter and Percy Jackson and have lost all their regard for lights out dictates… So we’ve begun double checking, ensuring books are down (a nice problem to have, I have to admit). Compliance has increased, crabbiness is waning. If we could get a nice day or two, we just might be getting somewhere. In the meantime, Momma needs some new dinner magic. This week I’m adding a couple of recipes from the Meatless Monday website. This is a great resource for anyone trying to up the plant content of their plate, which doctors seem to be agreeing is the thing to do. What do you do when you get in a recipe rut? Me, I’m gonna shake it up a little and see where that gets me. We could all use a little tree shaking now and again.

Monday: Lentil, Mushroom, and Sweet Potato Soup, Homemade Bread, green salad

Tuesday: Peppers Stuffed with Healthy Yum, roasted cauliflower, cut veggies

Wednesday: Mushroom Po’Boys (inspired by these Morel Mushroom beauties from Meatless Monday’s site – personally I don’t have a line on morel mushrooms, if you do, go for it and don’t tell anyone), sautéed green beans, green salad

Thursday: Potato pancakes, grilled vegetables, wedge salads with miso dressing

Friday: Homemade Pizza, cut veggies

Saturday: Company Good Pea Soup, Homemade Bread, green salad

Sunday: Easter Dinner at Grammy’s

Lunchbox Treats: Awesome Oatie Bars

Adult Lunches: Avocado Radish Salad from Meatless Monday’s site


That’s what we’re up to. What’s new with you? What trees are you shaking? Anything fall yet? Eat well, be well friends!

Weekly Meal Plan 2/16-2/22

I am so blessed. A surprise drop in from good friends, lots of music, lots of play, and now a lovely snow falling in a way that makes me think we might score an unanticipated weekend recovery day with sledding tomorrow. Yay! Bring on the snow gear! Bring on the hot chocolate! Bring on the hot food! There is little better in winter than a bona fide meteorological excuse for eating comfort food. And so we shall proceed this week. Light and refreshing? No – that’s not what we’re shooting for. We want warm, belly filling, and homey.

Monday: Mulligatawny Soup, served with brown rice, salad, and some cooling plain yogurt for the kids

Tuesday: Mushroom Stroganoff over whole wheat noodles (from the The Engine 2 Diet, green salad, wilted mediterranean kale

Wednesday: Slow Cooker Creamy Tomato Soup, Multigrain Bread, sunflower cheese, cut veggies

Thursday: Rockin’ Gluten Free Falafel, whole wheat pitas, sandwich veggies, carrot fries, green salad

Friday: Homemade Pizza, cut veggies

Saturday: Cauliflower Steaks, quinoa, sautéed green beans, salad

Sunday: Homemade Pasta

Hot Breakfasts: Oatmeal (like this one from Bg Sis), Hot & Hearty Quinoa Porridge

Lunchbox Treats: Almond Lemon Jots

Adult Lunches: Picadillo


Yay! A week’s worth of comforting belly warming food and a snow covered landscape to look at while I eat. I hope your meteorological desires are being met and that you are enjoying a warm bowl of yum! Eat well, be well friends!

Weekly Meal Plan 2/9-2/15

I’m told that it was on this day in 1870 that the National Weather Service was established (then called something else and under the war department). While I’m generally glad to have weather forecasting information; today’s forecast does not exactly put me in a celebratory mood. While last winter we had a lot of snow and I confess to having grown weary with the constant uncertainty about the school schedule in that situation, I have come to the conclusion that snow is preferable to the usual mid-Maryland winter weather event offering: wintry mix. While we have rain at the moment, temperatures will drop and tonight we’ll have our beloved Mid-Atlantic travel boondoggle that includes sleet and snow, and over time maybe also some freezing rain. Not quite cold enough for graupel. If you live somewhere warmer, you get rain. If you live somewhere colder, you get snow. Here, we get about 12 variations on slippery snow/rain – let’s call it snain. With the grey skies and no hope of a lovely blanket of snow and sledding, I am quite tempted to take comfort in my non-snow blanket and just hibernate for a few days until the temperatures change again. Comfort food and experimentation might help keep the wheels turning.

Monday: Lentil Casserole (we didn’t have this last week because the stomach bug spread), sautéed green beans, green salad

Tuesday:  Roasted sweet potatoes and plantains (similar to Naturally Sweet Sweet Potatoes), Spicy Hemp Breakfast Sausages, spinach and orange salad

Wednesday: Lentil Bulghur Burgers, roasted potatoes, cut veggies and freezer pickles

Thursday: Korean BBQ Tofu Tacos, green salad

Friday: Homemade Pizza, cut veggies

Saturday: Dinner Out

Sunday: Homemade Pasta, green salad

Lunchbox Treat: Healthy Pumpkin Cookies

Adult Lunches: Cold Kickin’ Soup – no we’re not currently sick, but I think a little immunity boost would do us some good right now.


I feel better already just from talking about all that yummy food. Pair that with another night of good sleep and I’m sure things will seem much brighter. I have been getting more sleep (generally, not necessarily consistently) and I have to say that it’s pretty clear how much difference an extra hour makes for me. It’s easier to wake up in the morning. I’m more productive when I’m awake. I’m more patient and more resilient in the face of a problem. I am working on shoring up my resolve and continuing to eliminate or sideline the obstacles that prevent me from getting enough sleep, interfering with my Year of Well-Being. Hope you are rested and enjoying a sunny day in spirit if not in reality. Eat well, be well friends!

Weekly Meal Plan 11/24-11/30

Hey Friends! The idea of doing a meal plan this week is particularly daunting for some reason. As I think I’ve mentioned before, the holidays tend to put me in something of a state, and the closer the holiday, the harder it becomes to focus on anything but “the meal” or “the moment.” Perhaps then this is the most important kind of post to write. Perhaps taking a few minutes to focus on the other meals that we’ll be eating this week will help me gain perspective, will help me slow down a little and remember that every holiday is also a day amongst many others. That day will not be perfect no matter what I do, and being sure I am well nourished and balanced because of my efforts leading up to and away from that celebration can only help me relax and enjoy myself. WIth that in mind I will attempt to do slightly more than the slapdash job of a menu plan that I promised myself I would complete today. ;-) Or maybe it will be slapdash, but it will be done and that will be good enough. Even a quick plan full of healthy homemade food is better than nothing, right?

 photo 2268252a-418c-4369-a086-5da064f1dedf.jpgMonday: Varia Bowls with rice noodles (this didn’t happen last week due to a sick kid preventing rice noodle procurement), tofu and veggies (it’s 70 degrees here today?!)

Tuesday: Burritos with the last of the peppers from the garden

Wednesday: Mulligatawny Soup, Homemade Bread, Green Salad

Thursday: Thanksgiving (see this post for ideas about what we’ll be eating)

Friday: Homemade Pizza, cut veggies

Saturday: Dinner with Friends – Yay!!

Sunday: Homemade Pasta with Spinach, Green Salad

You’ve likely noticed the repetitive homemade pizza and pasta phenomenon. These are two meals that my kids love (no shocker there) and that the big people in the house thoroughly enjoy as well. Because we stretch our kids so regularly with new and unusual foods, we greatly enjoy these regularly scheduled opportunities to enjoy a healthy homemade version of something they genuinely love. They eat. They don’t grouse. We eat. We don’t’ grouse. ;-) Grouse-free evenings are an important part of any family dining strategy. Here’s hoping that your holiday is low stress, delicious, and full of good times with good company.

Sugar in Cereals – New Information from EWG

Well friends, Environmental Working Group, the same folks who bring us the annual sunscreen report, have done an analysis of boxed cereals, and as we’ve suggested in the past, the news is not good. The worst of the bunch are 12 cereals that are more than 50 % sugar. Let me say that again, cereals that are more than 50% sugar.

Take a moment and picture a bowl of say, Rice Krispies or Cheerios. Now picture that bowl with a line down the middle, cereal to the left and sugar to the right, in equal measure. That is what a bowl full of Froot Loops with Marshmallows or Honey Smacks is. All of these cereals that EWG places in the “Hall of Shame” are marketed with animated characters, bright colors, and some even make nutrition claims about high fiber and other benefits that are drowned in half a bowl of sugar.

If you or your tribe members eat boxed cereal, give this writeup a look, see where your favorites are. If you need to make some changes, EWG has made some general suggestions on how to cut back on the morning sugar rush. In our house when the sugar numbers on cereals started creeping up (meaning above 5g per serving), we began insisting that the kids mix that cereal with one that is MUCH lower (like 1g). We also limit the quantity and will offer them other food if they are still hungry. I found that the kids would continue eating cereal long after they were satisfied. When they asked for more and I offered an alternative, they’d say “No, I’m full.” The sugar keeps them coming back, long after their appetites are satisfied. Part of the magic of that sweet demon I suppose, but one over which we have some control.

Not sure why all the fuss over sugary cereals? Take a look at this on what sugar does to your brain. Or read about the insulin response produced by eating the sugar regularly included in processed foods that researchers believe may be the leading cause of obesity here.

Thank you EWG for looking at this serious issue and helping to shed some light on the giant and ridiculous cereal aisle.

For more information about teaching children about healthful morning choices, see Lessons From the Cereal Aisle. For more information about reducing the sugar in your diet, see Big Sis’ post about Reducing Sugar One Teaspoon at a Time.

The Common Ground to Eating Lifestyles

I didn’t want to say diet because the big ‘ways of eating’ or ‘eating lifestyles’ that are out there right now such as vegan, paleo and GAPS are NOT diets.  They are approaches to eating and are intended to be forever, not a temporary withdrawal of something until weight reaches a desired level.  And let’s be honest, the forever part sometimes comes with an amount of rigidity that can spawn righteousness, ugliness and intolerance.  Can you have some vegans and some paleo eaters over on the same night and expect peace all evening?  Well, with some people you can, but I know many bloggers who feel themselves to be in a certain camp who are then lambasted by people who feel they are either in the wrong camp or have swerved too far out of the campsite……even if they were chasing a fabulous butterfly or helping their child get to the latrine at the time!

It’s odd, because as a nurse I can attest to the fact that different medications have different effects on different people.  Same species, different effect.  There is huge variety between members of our species regarding allergic reactions, effect on bowel movements, mood, and weight, even one eats the same exact thing as the person standing behind him or her in the cafeteria line.  Why then would we assume that the same eating lifestyle would be optimal for everyone?  It won’t, and it isn’t and so there.  So where does this leave us and why am I risking getting flamed by the tee-totallers?

We are left with the common ground to the eating lifestyles and I use the word ‘ground’ on purpose.  The Lifestyles: Paleo, Vegan, GAPS and many others, recommend in one way or another that you eat natural foods and avoid processed foods.  They can all agree that it is good to eat more vegetables, eat less Twinkies.  Eat more that either came from the ground, or from something that ate something that came from the ground, and less pre-packaged, pre-chemicalized, pre-preserved, pre-pared by someone other than you or your Aunt Marge, foods.   As often as possible.

All of the lifestyles have marvelous science, tests, books, and even movies to back up their point of view, but I know from years of experimentation that there is no one with the exact same digestion as me.  I know for a fact that I can not do dairy, and have a very tough time with beans, but that is not true for everyone.  I do not have any physical problems eating meat, but frankly I am much more comfortable eating meat that came from well-treated, naturally fed animals and I can not afford to do that often so I eat less meat.  Me, me, me, it’s all about me isn’t it?  Well, when it comes to what works for ME nutritionally speaking, yes.  There are valid arguments about how the raising of different foods affects the planet and I take that into account in my purchasing, but it ain’t easy feeding a family ideally all the time.

Just had to stick in a picture of some veggies – Little Sis’ quick and easy “Chemical Free Simply Fabu Sweet and Sour Pickles20140427_132043-001

Here’s another reason to drop the flags and banners and just educate people about the very real trouble with processed foods and the Food Industry.  If you narrow your diet too dramatically you miss out on a lot of delightful social happenings.  If I can’t eat at anyone’s home but my own then I have seriously limited my experience of the world and I would miss the interactions that tend to happen when people gather to eat.  Sometimes at a gathering, celebration, restaurant or party you just have to do the best you can with what is there.  Of course people who eschew animal products for ethical or religious reasons have to be choosier, but it is very rare that there is not something edible for most everyone.

So back to an eating lifestyle…… Little Sis and I began the Baby Steps series because it is difficult to attain a healthier, much less completely healthy, lifestyle.  Making changes to your diet is difficult and believing that life is all vegan/paleo/GAPS all the time or nothing, leads a lot of people to failure in making lifestyle changes.  Pay attention to and try to decrease the amount of processed food in your diet and you are choosing the bottom line element of lifestyle eating that has so powerfully affected people’s lives that they think their way works for everyone.   Maybe the common denominator of less processed food is also the common denominator for feeling and looking better with these changes!

Everytime you eat more healthfully……you are eating more healthfully!  Seriously.  That is WAY better than less healthfully.  If you need some encouragement, check out our Baby Steps series and our Sugar Busting series, because unfortunately, sugar outside of plants and milk is a processed food and is heavily present in most processed foods.

I often counsel patients who are trying to improve their eating habits / lose weight / lower blood pressure, etc. to start with the vegetables.  Eat more vegetables up front and there won’t be as much for the other stuff….preferably the other stuff is the least processed possible, for you, at this time, in this situation with these people.  It’s really all you can do and still remain mildly sane – personally I have given up on totally sane!

Chickpea and Cashew Tikka Masala (GF,V)

IMG_0283Things have been a little rough here at the Northern office of the pantry. I’m now 4 weeks out of foot surgery and while things are decidedly better, I am still somewhat limited in my activities and as the day wears on I get pretty uncomfortable from swelling and aches associated with walking on this ridiculous contraption. As a result, my desire to stand and cook for extended periods of time is pretty limited.

While I was sitting on my fanny for the initial two weeks after surgery, I did have the opportunity to come across a feature in Vegetarian Times on “30 Minute Skillet Suppers.” Yes, please. So last night I gave one of these a go, and in my usual fashion I made some modifications to make it just right for my family (yogurt out, cashews in; serrano chile out – red pepper and chile powder in; fresh ginger out – powdered in).  This experiment was wildly successful, and it really did only take 30 minutes. The cashews balanced the spice and I love the texture they added. The greater adjustability with powdered chili allowed me to knock it down for the kids and adjust on the plate for Mr. Little Sis. My sore feet and legs were spared extra standing and our little tribe got to enjoy some fabulous Indian flavors for a very reasonable price, right there on a weeknight in our kitchen.

Chickpea and Cashew Tikka Masala (GF,V) – inspired by Vegetarian Times’ Chickpea Tikka Masala

  • olive oil for panIMG_0297
  • 1 c finely chopped onion
  • 1.5 T garam masala
  • 1.5 T tomato paste
  • 1.5 t powdered ginger (or 3 t fresh grated – I was out)
  • 1/2 red or yellow pepper, chopped
  • 2 c cooked chckpeas
  • 3 small cans diced tomatoes
  • pinch paprika
  • pinch chipotle or other chile powder to taste
  • 1 c raw cashews
  • chopped cilantro

Warm oil in large skillet (I used cast iron – the pan should be relatively deep). Add onions and a sprinkle of salt. Sauté  onions for about 5 minutes on low-medium heat, until onions are translucent. Add tomato paste and spices (other than paprika and chile). Cook for another minute or so – until the spices become fragrant. Add peppers and sauté about another minute. Add chickpeas and tomatoes and bring to a boil. Lower heat to simmer, add cashews and remaining spices. Simmer for at least 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. We served ours with leftover rice and chopped cilantro as a garnish.  Absolutely delish and deeply satisfying.

IMG_0285 IMG_0289 IMG_0293

For more quick dinners, as well as some thoughts on convenience food, check out Big Sis’ post ReCon Convenience, Step 7 in our Baby Steps Series.

Digging Indian flavors? Give these dishes a try: Mulligatawny Soup, Pakistani Lentil Kima, and Cashew Carrot Curry.

Baby Step 5: It’s Time For A Plan

By now I suspect you’re getting a little weary of legwork.  You’ve experimented with a swap, you’ve kept a food journal, and you’ve investigated your pantry, and you’ve thought for a bit about how to get those with whom you eat the most on board with the idea of a new approach to food.  You didn’t realize you’d already done so much, did you?  Didn’t do it all?  That’s okay.  Jump in here, go back to the beginning and start there – whatever.  There is no timeline.

The only due date I’d like to suggest is that you do something today.  No, don’t wait until January…  Waiting until January means losing a month of taking baby steps down the road.  Yes, there are more holidays coming, and you can decide how to deal with them, but they aren’t TODAY.  There’s no reason you can’t get a little ahead of the game and celebrate whatever season it is for you with a glow of better health and the satisfaction of knowing that in addition to anything you’re doing for others, you’re also taking care of yourself.  Convinced?  Yay!  It’s time to make a plan….

Gather your stuff.  Get that food journal.  Open that pantry door.  Peek in the refrigerator.  Your mission is to make a list of foods that you’d like to baby step out of your diet.  No, you don’t need to come up with a specific number.  And yes, we will help you figure out which ones to start with if you’re not sure.  Let’s see if we can’t make some progress with a few simple questions.

  1. As you look at your food journal, is there something that you know is unhealthy and that you eat regularly for the sake of convenience or to treat yourself?  Perhaps you have a soda habit or a frappucino addiction.  These are perfect places to start – a food that is not a meal, it’s offering no nutrition, and it’s loaded with sugar.  Am I telling you to ditch them altogether? You know me better than that. Cut them out, cut them down, wean yourself, swap them out for something healthier.  Whatever a baby step is to you… do that.
  2. As you consider your food choices, does carry out or fast food play a major role in your lunch or dinner meal planning?  Set a goal for eating one more home cooked meal or one more brown bagged lunch per week than whatever your current total is.
  3. As you examine that pantry you’ve already peeped in, take notice of the number of packaged snacks.  This is an excellent place to experiment with some snack swaps or learning to make a homemade snack.
  4. As you peek in the fridge, take notice of the beverages that are available.  How many of them are sweet?  How many of them are juice or juice-like?  Another excellent place to get started.  Remember, you don’t have to throw it out (unless you want to, and I’m certainly not going to stop you).  Cut the amount, cut the frequency, mix it with water, swap it for something healthier.
  5. Still not sure where to get started?  Some basic categories you should consider: foods with a lot of sugar or corn syrup, foods that contain excessive fat (especially hydrogenated fats), foods that contain excessive sodium (in all its forms), and highly processed foods (like those that stay good for a REALLY long time).
  6. Still at a loss?  I’m going to point you toward Michael Pollin’s food rules – eat food, real food, mostly vegetables.

Overwhelmed.  Don’t be.  Now is when you take all those answers and thinking and make a list of foods or food categories that you want to work to eliminate from your diet.  It could look something like this:

  • sugary cereals
  • soda
  • chips
  • carry out

My current list looks like this

  • caffeine (UGH)
  • salt on the plate
  • afternoon sweet

So am I going to do all of these at once?  Maybe, but I won’t cut them all out.  For my caffeine problem, I’m switching from two large mugs of my beloved coffee to one of coffee and one of black tea.  The next step will be to switch the black tea out for green tea.  Then black tea in the a.m., green tea in the afternoon… you get the picture.  I have reduced caffeine before and in addition to the headache, I’ve found that being abrupt on this one makes me miserable and inflicts some level of misery on those around me….  so I’m going to step it down, achieve my goal at a pace that allows me to make adjustments, allows me to tame my body’s addiction over time without being a horrible grouch for the holidays.

Once you’ve got a list of things you’d like to cut/limit/wean yourself off of, choose a starting place.  Pick one of them and consider how you want to proceed.  Limit the quantity?  Swap it out? Cut it altogether?  Your answer will be different from my answer – what is a baby step to you may seem like a huge leap to me.  This is YOUR plan, not a test of your character, but  series of decisions you get to make for yourself.

Finally, write down the steps you’re going to follow to get started on that change.  If you’re going to limit your quantity, write down how that’s going to work – what’s the new limit and what are you going to do to replace that item?  If you’re cutting a sweet treat in the middle of your work day, what are you going to either eat or do to replace that ritual?  Write it down.  Write down your start date (today) and then give yourself a goal date for reaching whatever your desired change is on that item.

If you want to ditch chewy granola bars, write down when you’re going to start (today), write down what you’re going to do instead (there could be a few steps here), and write down the date by which you hope to be done changing this food habit.  Does that mean you’ll never eat one again?  Maybe, but probably not.

Remember what Big Sis said – the key to healthy eating is making healthful decisions as often as you can.  Establish a new pattern so that the chewy granola bar (or soda, or candy or drive through) is an exception rather than the rule. Open the door to improved nutrition and prepare to be wowed as your taste buds come back to life and you discover new satisfaction in eating for your health.

And just in case you’re wondering, this isn’t all about what we cut out… we have plenty of suggestions about what to cut in. A little delish, morning, noon, and night comin’ up.
If you need help with some swaps, read this step.  No suggestion that works for you there?  Ask us!  We’ll answer, and probably some others will too.  You don’t have to figure it all out yourself… and if you don’t like your plan a week from now, know what you get to do?  Change it.  It’s YOUR plan.

Baby Step 4: Adventure, Experimentation, and Gratitude

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard it: “I want to eat healthier, but my kids (partner, whomever) won’t eat that food.”  Everyone who said it was 100% certain that this was true.  The only thing I am 100% certain about as regards feeding others healthy food is that if you don’t have it/make it/serve it, they certainly won’t eat it.

Changing our own eating habits is hard; convincing others that this is a group project can be daunting at best, but the difficulty of the task doesn’t mean the effort is not worth it.  Big Sis and I have both enlisted our families (immediate and in some cases extended) in our pantry transformations and we have some ideas that just might help you do the same.  The truth is that, as with any meal, eating real food is easier and more enjoyable when you do it with the people that you love.

So here we approach the core of Baby Step 4: just as eating healthier foods requires you to be more conscious of what you’re eating and how you’re making it, so too will rallying the troops involve an evolution in consciousness about food.  You must be the leader in the movement to develop an attitude of adventure, experimentation and gratitude surrounding food and mealtimes in your home.

Our suggestions fall into three basic categories:

  1. The Use and Acceptance of Baby Steps as Progress
  2. Attitudinal Adjustments
  3. Education

Baby Steps

I can’t speak for everybody, but when I embark on a new venture that I’m enthusiastic about, I want to share it.  I want to share it with everybody and I (unreasonably) want everyone to be as excited as I am…  It’s sweet, isn’t it?  The cold water of reality is a bit uncomfortable.  Just because I’m enthused doesn’t mean they will be.  My loved ones’ priorities might be entirely different than mine and the mental steps I’ve taken to prepare myself for this wonderful new transformation have not been their mental steps as well.  If we can agree that baby steps are an effective tool for making changes in our eating habits, we must remember that those we wish to encourage (and feed) deserve the same gracious and gentle introduction to foods with which they are unfamiliar and that they may not be initially inspired by.  Does this mean don’t try? No, no it doesn’t.  It may mean don’t try ALL the time.  It may mean be ready to see consumption without complaint (but no real enjoyment) as progress over grousing.  It may mean lovingly saying that you understand when deep inside you’d like to remove all the plates from the table and tell everybody to….  okay, that’s just me now and again – I know, it’s not pretty.

1. Establish baby steps with your family by: designating one meal per week to be healthier food night/ or healthier entree or side dish night if you need a gentler step.

Attitudinal Adjustments

Family mealtime means different things to different people and for many folks it is comfort.  When we are trying new foods, it’s not always so very comfortable.  So rather than highlighting the comfort of familiar foods, we must highlight the adventure of trying new things.  This can be particularly challenging with little people.  I get it, really I do.  But again, if we give up all we can be sure of is that they will NEVER try the new food.  If we persist and attempt to make it fun, who knows what will happen?

This is what we remind my sweeties of.  If you don’t TRY it, you’ll never know.  We then remind them of the foods they’ve tried and discovered how delicious they are.  If we’re trying a dish that highlights flavors from another culture, we talk about that place and the role that this food plays there.  We take an adventure.  When they are adventurous with their food, we lavish them with praise.  Big Sis had a great idea that I think we will implement – the adventurous eater medallion.  We may also try adventurous eating hats. Occasionally, in desperation, we appeal to their sibling rivalry and have a race to try the new food.  I can’t say the last method encourages delightful table manners, but it does seem to work.

Feeding this little mug is not always easy.

In addition the the positive role that adventurousness and competition can play, there is no way to overstate the importance of gratitude at the table.  Mr. Little Sis has instituted a fabulous family tradition at the beginning of our meals.  As head chef, I occasionally become discouraged by the cajoling that feeding twin 5 year olds can require.  When we sit down to eat, Mr. Little Sis immediately says, “Thank You Mommy, for making such a wonderful meal for us.”  The twins usually follow on quickly, even if they are mid-complaint or moving stuff around to see what’s under there icky-face-making.

The most interesting thing about it is that once they’ve said thank you, they rarely return to the complaints, at least not with volume and vigor, which helps keep the mood at the table a little lighter, and prevents them from discouraging one another from trying new foods. Highlighting the importance of gratitude in a positive way, “We are so fortunate to have this healthy and nourishing food, and to be able to enjoy it together,” over the “There are starving kids all over the world who would be happy to eat that ____,” rightly changes the focus at the table from whether or not the meal meets every individual’s expectations to mealtime as a time to come together and recharge.

2. Establish adventurousness and gratitude by asking for it and acknowledging it.  Reward adventurousness and model gratitude.


Different strategies work for different people.  Some like the games (my daughter) and some need the rationale.  I am still making this meal even though you’ve expressed it’s not your favorite because it has ingredients in it that do _____ inside your body.  Anything that helps that boy’s allergies will go in the mouth.  Guaranteed.  It is difficult NOT to take advantage of that knowledge.  We’ve also talked a great deal about why I pack their lunches and why I don’t include many of the things their friends eat regularly.  I marvel at the lack of pushback on this.  They occasionally express their severe deprivation (along with a host of injustices that I have perpetrated), but they also, I’ve found, are able to make choices that they would not if we didn’t share so much food information.

I’ve discovered that when they are offered a treat at a party, they limit themselves, without my saying anything.  They tell me when they’ve had a surprise goody at school or with friends so that I can make adjustments to what I give them for the rest of the day.  They GET IT.  When they’re older and they ask about McDonald’s (or whatever) rather than toeing the line on that front as they do now, perhaps we’ll sit down and watch SuperSize Me together.  My husband and I watched several food documentaries before we embarked on the last round of dietary changes, discussed the information we found, researched the questions that remained.  Just as I need information to make a big change, so too do the loved ones in my life.

3. Educate your loved ones by telling them why you are doing what you are doing.

So your Baby Step?  What should you do?  You should consider your surroundings and try (gently and patiently) to get’em on board.  Your life will be easier; your food will be healthier; and your table will be a place of adventure, experimentation, and gratitude while you tackle another pantry swap, or try a new recipe.  Baby Steps for you, Baby Steps for them.  It worked for all of us once, right?